Sunday, September 24, 2017

Contact

EMBASSY OF THE KINGDOM OF SWEDEN
Chancery: Ledi Pedžet 2, Belgrade
Tel: +381 (11) 2069-200
Fax: +381 (11) 2069-250
E-mail: ambassaden.belgrad@gov.se
Web page: http://www.swedenabroad.com/belgrade

Working hours:
Monday – Thursday: 09.00-17.00h
Friday: 09.00-14.00h

Migration Section:
Tel: +381 (11) 2069-270
Fax: +381 (11) 2069-251
E-mail: ambassaden.belgrad-visum@gov.se

Working hours: 09.00-11.00h
(Closed on Wednesday)

Commercial Section:
Genex Apartments/A302
Vladimira Popovića 6, Belgrade
Tel: +381 (11) 3113-017, +381 (11) 3113-019
Fax: +381 (11) 3113-161


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H.E. Mr. Jan Lundin

H.E. Mr. Jan Lundin

As from 28 July 2016, Mr Jan Lundin is the new ambassador of Sweden to Serbia and Montenegro.

Jan LundinH.E. Mr Jan Lundin, Ambassador of Sweden presented the letters of credence, signed by the King of Sweden, His Majesty Carl XVI Gustaf to the President of the Republic of Montenegro, Mr Filip Vujanovic on 26 July and to the President of the Republic of Serbia Mr Tomislav Nikolic on 28 July 2016.

Prior to his post as Ambassador of Sweden to Serbia and Montenegro, Jan Lundin was appointed Director General of the Council of the Baltic Sea States (CBSS) Permanent International Secretariat, Stockholm from 1 September 2010.  Being a career diplomat at the Swedish Foreign Service, he came from the posting as Deputy Head of Mission at the Embassy of Sweden to Germany.

Mr Lundin graduated from the University of Stockholm in 1996 with a Master of Law. He had previously studied at the University of Uppsala where he was awarded his Bachelor of Arts in Slavic Languages, East European Area Studies and Economics.

Alongside his native Swedish, he has knowledge of ten languages and fluency in four, including Serbian, English,  German, and Russian.

He is married and has two daughters.

Jan Lundin assumed the role of Director General of the Council of the Baltic Sea States (CBSS) Permanent International Secretariat, Stockholm on 1 September 2010.

The Council appointed Mr. Lundin for an initial period of four years until 2014. His contract was signed by the Norwegian Chairman of the Council’s Committee of Senior Officials on the 1 July.

Jan Lundin is a career member of the Swedish Senior Foreign Service. His most recent post prior to his appointment as Director General was Minister, Deputy Head of Mission at the Embassy of Sweden to Germany, additionally holding the function of Head of the Political Department. Under the leadership of the Ambassador H.E. Ruth Jacoby he planned and led the implementation of 2009 Swedish EU Presidency in Germany, whereby he together with German stakeholders organised and participated in a number of events related to Sweden’s EU Presidency and the adoption of the EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region.

Mr Lundin began his professional career in 1984, serving at the Embassy of Sweden in Belgrade until 1986.

Between 1987-88, he worked as a researcher for the Stockholm Institute for Soviet and East European Economics as well as the Institute for Soviet and East European Politics at Uppsala University.

In 1989, he worked as a political editor for a Swedish newspaper, after which he took on the role of Area Manager at the Swedish Trade Council where he was responsible for developing trade relations with Poland.

He returned to the Swedish Foreign Service in 1992 when he was posted as First Secretary at the Embassy of Sweden to Lithuania, a role which he held until 1994.

The next three years saw him posted in Moscow at the rank of Counsellor at the Embassy of Sweden to the Russian Federation. In his forth year in Moscow he assumed the role of European Executive Director of the Russian-European Centre for Economic Policy (RECEP) where, amongst other accomplishments, he organised a major conference on Russian Economic Policy.

In 1999, he returned to Stockholm and to his longstanding interest in strengthening regional cooperation in the Western Balkan region. He was the coordinator of the newly established Stability Pact for South Eastern Europe at the Swedish Foreign Ministry. In this position he led Sweden’s role in the international efforts to assist the countries of South Eastern Europe to foster peace, democracy, and respect for human rights, economic prosperity and security. This focus would continue when he returned to Belgrade to serve as Counsellor and Deputy Head of Mission at the Swedish Embassy to Serbia. He completed his posting in Belgrade in 2006 when he given the rank of Minister and subsequently began his four years in Berlin.

Mr Lundin graduated from the University of Stockholm in 1996 with a Master of Law. He had previously studied at the University of Uppsala where he was awarded his Bachelor of Arts in Slavic Languages, East European Area Studies and Economics.

Alongside his native Swedish, he has knowledge of ten languages and fluency in four, including the three main languages of the Council – English, German, and Russian as well as Serbo-Croat.

He is married and has two daughters.”

http://cbss.idynamic.lv/Contact/director-general

National Day: June 6th

Sweden

Officially the Kingdom of Sweden (Swedish: About this sound Konungariket Sverige (help·info)), is a Scandinavian country in Northern Europe. It borders Norway to the west and Finland to the east, and is connected to Denmark in the southwest via a bridge-tunnel across the Öresund. At 450,295 square kilometres (173,860 sq mi), Sweden is the third-largest country in the European Union by area, with a total population of over 9.8 million. Sweden consequently has a low population density of 21 inhabitants per square kilometre (54/sq mi), with the highest concentration in the southern half of the country. Approximately 85% of the population lives in urban areas. Southern Sweden is predominantly agricultural, while the north is heavily forested. Sweden is part of the geographical area of Fennoscandia. The climate is in general very mild for its northerly latitude due to significant maritime influence, that in spite of this still retains warm continental summers.

Germanic peoples have inhabited Sweden since prehistoric times, emerging into history as the Geats/Götar and Swedes/Svear and constituting the sea peoples known as the Norsemen. Sweden emerged as an independent and unified country during the Middle Ages. In the 17th century, it expanded its territories to form the Swedish Empire, which became one of the great powers of Europe until the early 18th century. Swedish territories outside the Scandinavian Peninsula were gradually lost during the 18th and 19th centuries, beginning with the annexation of present-day Finland by Russia in 1809. The last war in which Sweden was directly involved was in 1814, when Norway was militarily forced into personal union.

Since then, Sweden has been at peace, maintaining an official policy of neutrality in foreign affairs. The union with Norway was peacefully dissolved in 1905, leading to Sweden’s current borders. Though it was formally neutral through both world wars, Sweden engaged in humanitarian efforts, such as taking in refugees from German-occupied Europe. After the end of the Cold War, Sweden joined the European Union on 1 January 1995, but declined NATO membership.

Today, Sweden is a constitutional monarchy and a parliamentary democracy, with the Monarch as the head of state. The capital city is Stockholm, which is also the most populous city in the country. Legislative power is vested in the 349-member unicameral Riksdag. Executive power is exercised by the Government, chaired by the Prime Minister. Sweden is a unitary state, currently divided into 21 counties and 290 municipalities.

Sweden maintains a Nordic social welfare system that provides universal health care and tertiary education for its citizens. It has the world’s eighth-highest per capita income and ranks highly in numerous metrics of national performance, including quality of life, health, education, protection of civil liberties, economic competitiveness, equality, prosperity and human development. Sweden has been a member of the European Union since 1 January 1995, but declined Eurozone membership following a referendum. It is also a member of the United Nations, the Nordic Council, Council of Europe, the World Trade Organization and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

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